Space Rules

suchtango:

underthesymmetree:

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Earth orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

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O.o

ageofdestruction:

claudette: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 10 April 2008.

On the Vastitas Borealis. Believe this image runs about 660 km from 79°N 55°E to 68°N 62°E.

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour and one monochrome for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

crookedindifference:

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than artThis incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.-JBBImage credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

This is amazing but calling it “better than art” assumes that art and science are mutually exclusive, which they aren’t.

crookedindifference:

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than art

This incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.

SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.

The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

This is amazing but calling it “better than art” assumes that art and science are mutually exclusive, which they aren’t.

(Source: facebook.com)


The Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn’s north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings.

The Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn’s north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings.

sagansense:

christinetheastrophysicist:

NASA’s Swift satellite has detected a sudden burst of energy coming from our neighboring galaxy M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. It is unclear exactly what this is at the moment, either a gamma ray burst (GRB) or an ultra-luminous x-ray source (ULX), but both outcomes are very exciting, especially since this occurred so close to us.
If this energetic source turns out to be a gamma ray burst, it was likely created from a collision of neutron stars. If an ultra-luminousx-ray source, the cause would be a black hole consuming matter.
There is a lot of discussion about this happening on Twitter right now. Check out #GRBm31 for what astronomers and astrophysicists are saying.

More unfolding news on this HERE and HERE!
Related: previous posts on Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs).

sagansense:

christinetheastrophysicist:

NASA’s Swift satellite has detected a sudden burst of energy coming from our neighboring galaxy M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. It is unclear exactly what this is at the moment, either a gamma ray burst (GRB) or an ultra-luminous x-ray source (ULX), but both outcomes are very exciting, especially since this occurred so close to us.

If this energetic source turns out to be a gamma ray burst, it was likely created from a collision of neutron stars. If an ultra-luminousx-ray source, the cause would be a black hole consuming matter.

There is a lot of discussion about this happening on Twitter right now. Check out #GRBm31 for what astronomers and astrophysicists are saying.

More unfolding news on this HERE and HERE!

Related: previous posts on Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs).

(Source: jonyorkblog)

ageofdestruction:

checkpoint: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 11th August 2007.

From about 71°S 285°E to 81°S 277°E; approximately 600 km long and 57 km wide.

At top left, the edge of Schmidt Crater is visible on the northeast edge of Aonia Terra; below, the terrain is cut into by the Cavus Angusti; the brown area is the Planum Angustum; ridged by the Australe Scopuli that surround the south pole.

Composite of visible light images; colours are not naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

utcjonesobservatory:

This image of 30 Doradus, the Tarantula Nebula, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, as part of the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) project. The Tarantula Nebula is a giant star-forming region, where energy from hot, young stars in the region creates dramatic voids and filaments in the surrounding gas. Located 160,000 light-years distant in the southern constellation Dorado, the LMC is considered the closest large galaxy to Earth.  Because of the proximity and low foreground absorption of the LMC, it is an ideal laboratory both for studies of individual HII regions, supernova remnants, and superbubbles, and for investigations of global properties using samples of these objects. MCELS is designed to provide uniform datasets in optical emission lines that are necessary to conduct this research. The MCELS observations toward the 30 Doradus region have been used to investigate the physical properties of the HII region, examine the physical conditions of supernova remnants in the field, and study the large-scale structure of the ionized gas.  This color image was produced using three separate exposures taken in hydrogen (red), sulfur (green), and oxygen (blue) filters. Caption: NOAO. Please read Conditions of Use before downloading. S. POINTS, C. SMITH, R. LEITON, C. AGUILERA AND NOAO/AURA/NSF

utcjonesobservatory:

This image of 30 Doradus, the Tarantula Nebula, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, as part of the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) project. The Tarantula Nebula is a giant star-forming region, where energy from hot, young stars in the region creates dramatic voids and filaments in the surrounding gas. Located 160,000 light-years distant in the southern constellation Dorado, the LMC is considered the closest large galaxy to Earth.  Because of the proximity and low foreground absorption of the LMC, it is an ideal laboratory both for studies of individual HII regions, supernova remnants, and superbubbles, and for investigations of global properties using samples of these objects. MCELS is designed to provide uniform datasets in optical emission lines that are necessary to conduct this research. The MCELS observations toward the 30 Doradus region have been used to investigate the physical properties of the HII region, examine the physical conditions of supernova remnants in the field, and study the large-scale structure of the ionized gas.  This color image was produced using three separate exposures taken in hydrogen (red), sulfur (green), and oxygen (blue) filters. Caption: NOAO. Please read Conditions of Use before downloading. S. POINTS, C. SMITH, R. LEITON, C. AGUILERA AND NOAO/AURA/NSF

ageofdestruction:

fever: The Sun, photographed by TRACE, 1st May 2004.
15 images in 19.5nm UV light emitted by highly ionized iron atoms (Fe XII) in the solar corona at about 1,200,000 °C.
Image credit: NASA/TRACE. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

fever: The Sun, photographed by TRACE, 1st May 2004.

15 images in 19.5nm UV light emitted by highly ionized iron atoms (Fe XII) in the solar corona at about 1,200,000 °C.

Image credit: NASA/TRACE. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

mikerugnetta:

chels:

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 


Glitch art goes interstellar.

good morning

mikerugnetta:

chels:

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

Glitch art goes interstellar.

good morning

(Source: explore-blog)